What we Export

1. Pulses

1.1 Chickpeas



Chickpea is the most important pulse crop in Ethiopia. The bulk of the crop variety in the country is dominated by the sweet Desi type, and the Kabuli type is also grown in limited areas. In Ethiopia chickpeas are consumed widely fresh as green vegetables, sprouted, fried roasted and boiled. It is also ground into flour to make baby feed mixed with other cereals, soup bread and meat. It is also used to rehabilitate depleted fallow lands through utilizing crop rotation system. Chickpeas in Ethiopia hold fourth in the production and area coverage in the total pulse category. Source: (EPOSPEA).



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1.2 Soya Beans



This is an annual herb of the leguminous family .it has green skin and is also called green bean. A recent addition to the Ethiopian pulse production, it is sweet in flavor. It grows in few areas of north Shoa. Hence it is not consumed widely like the other pulses. Despite its growing demand in the international market, there is a chronic shortage of supply in Ethiopia. Source: (EPOSPEA)



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1.3 Red Kidney Beans



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1.4 White Kidney Beans



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1.5 Red Speckled Beans



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1.6 White Speckled Beans



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2. Oil Seeds



2.1 Sesame Seed  



In Ethiopia a large number of sesame seed varieties exist. The varieties that are well known are Humera Gonder and Wellega. The Humera variety is appreciated worldwide for its aroma and sweet taste. It is suitable for various bakery products. The Gonder type is also suitable for the bakery market. The major competitive advantage of the Wellega type is its high oil content. Source: (EPOSPEA)  

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2.2 Niger Seed(Noug)

In Ethiopia a large number of sesame seed varieties exist. The varieties that are well known are Humera Gonder and Wellega. The Humera variety is appreciated worldwide for its aroma and sweet taste. It is suitable for various bakery products. The Gonder type is also suitable for the bakery market. The major competitive advantage of the Wellega type is its high oil content. Source: (EPOSPEA)

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3. Spices

3.1 Turmeric

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae. It is native to tropical South Asia and needs temperatures between 20 °C and 30 °C (68 °F and 86 °F) and a considerable amount of annual rainfall to thrive. Plants are gathered annually for their rhizomes, and propagated from some of those rhizomes in the following season. When not used fresh, the rhizomes are boiled for several hours and then dried in hot ovens, after which they are ground into a deep orange-yellow powder commonly used as a spice in curries and other South Asian and Middle Eastern cuisine, for dyeing, and to impart color to mustard condiments. Its active ingredient is curcumin and it has a distinctly earthy, slightly bitter, slightly hot peppery flavor and a mustardy smell. Curcumin can be used to test the alkalinity or acidity of foods. It turns yellow in an acidic food, and it turns red in an alkaline food. In medieval Europe, turmeric became known as Indian saffron since it was widely used as an alternative to the far more expensive saffron spice. Kasur district of Pakistan is the largest producer of turmeric in Pakistan. Nizamabad, a city in the south Indian state of Andhra pradesh, is the world’s largest producer and most important trading center of turmeric in Asia. Erode in Tamil Nadu is another important turmeric trading center that receives turmeric produced not only from Tamil Nadu, but also from the neighboring state of Karnataka. In history, Erode is also known as the “Turmeric City”. Sangli, a town in the southern part of the Indian western state of Maharashtra, is another large trading center for turmeric in Asia. Mayo cultivators introduced different varieties of turmeric in Kasur. Source: (EPOSPEA)

3.2 Black Cumin

Original black cumin (Carum bulbocastanum) is rarely available, so N. sativa is widely used instead; in India, Carum carvi is the substitute. Cumins are from the Apiaceae (Umbelliferae) family, but N. sativa is from Ranunculaceae family. Black cumin (not N. sativa) seeds come as paired or separate carpels, and are 3-4 mm long. They have a striped pattern of nine ridges and oil canals, and are fragrant (Ayurveda says, “Kaala jaaji sugandhaa cha” (black cumin seed is fragrant itself), blackish in colour, boat-shaped, and tapering at each extremity, with tiny stalks attached; it has been used for medicinal purposes for centuries, both as a herb and pressed into oil, in Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Source: (EPOSPEA)

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